Monthly Archives: mei 2012

Fedora 17: Mm.. this stew of beefy source tastes just right

30 mei 2012
By

Review Fedora 17 arrived on Tuesday following a three-week delay. Nicknamed Beefy Miracle, the Fedora Project promised “over and under-the-bun improvements that show off the power and flexibility of the advancing state of free software”.

That’s a bold claim for a package with such a ridiculous name. While this is a solid update with significant enhancements under the hood and the latest version of the GNOME desktop, there’s nothing particularly miraculous about it – just as we concluded in the review of the beta build.

A miraculous Fedora 17 would have included full support for Btrfs – the kernel at least supports the filing system – but that’s going to require a major rewrite of the Anaconda installer interface and has been postponed until at least Fedora 18.

A miraculous Fedora 17 would also have somehow wrangled the full complement of GNOME apps into supporting the new application-level menu in GNOME 3.4. Impossible, you say? Fedora has almost nothing to do with development of GNOME apps? Exactly, but it certainly would have been miraculous if Fedora has done pulled it off nonetheless.

Instead we have a very nice new version of Fedora that, while not miraculous, is well worth grabbing, especially for those of us still trying to adjust to GNOME 3.

GNOME 3.4 continues to polish GNOME 3, particularly the Shell where the search features have improved significantly. Results appear much faster and the Shell is much better at guessing what you want. It does not, however, show results for applications that are in the repos but not yet installed, a nice new feature you’ll find in the latest version of Ubuntu’s Unity search tool.

GNOME 3.4 also introduces the aforementioned application-level menu that sits in the GNOME Shell bar at the top of the screen and lists actions and options

Bron: The Register Lees het complete artikel hier: http://go.theregister.com/i/cfa/http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/30/fedora_17_review/

RedSleeve does RHEL-ish clone for ARM

30 mei 2012
By

If you are tired of waiting for Red Hat to do an official port of its Enterprise Linux commercial distribution to the ARM architecture, well then Red Sleeve Linux has just what you are looking for.

Like many of you, El Reg had no idea that RedSleeve Linux, a port of the upstream RHEL reworked to run on ARM RISC processors instead of X86, Power, and mainframe processors, even existed, but its existence came to light in the comment section in the story about Dell’s new ARM-based microservers, which are running the latest Ubuntu 12.04 LTS release from Canonical.

While Fedora and RHEL cloner CentOS are working on ARM ports, this one, created by Gordan Bobic, a developer at BSkyB and a former Unix platform architect at Siemens, and Don Gullett, of which not much is known. (This is very likely not the Don Gullett who was a pitcher for the New York Yankees and the Cincinnati Reds in the 1970s.)

The alpha release of RedSleeve Linux came out in February, and Bobic and Gullett are looking for people to tool around with it to see how it works, which is why we bring it up to you.

RedSleeve can’t actually say that it is a clone of RHEL, of course, but you have to admit it was pretty clever with the naming and branding to convey that message.

Gordon says that the vast majority of packages in RedSleeve were unchanged from the “upstream distribution RedSleeve is based on,” which he also referred to as “a 3rd party ARM port of a Linux distribution of a Prominent North American Enterprise Linux Vendor (PNAELV)”. Considering that this is an ARM port and its logo is a hand extended for a handshake, you could argue

Bron: The Register Lees het complete artikel hier: http://go.theregister.com/i/cfa/http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/29/redsleeve_enterprise_linux_arm/

SaaSplaza onderscheidt zich met service

25 mei 2012
By

Cloudaanbieder standaardiseert op Hyper-V en System Center

SaaSplaza heeft als aanbieder van Microsoft Dynamics uit de cloud een dominante positie op de wereldwijde cloud ERP-markt. Het geheim is een hoog serviceniveau. Klanten krijgen SLAs op het beschikbaarheidsniveau van de applicatie, niet enkel op het niveau van de infrastructuur. Dit wordt mogelijk gemaakt door de Microsoft System Center Suite.


SaaSplaza heeft een lange historie. Het bedrijf begon, destijds onder een andere naam, in de jaren 90 als datacenter en heeft altijd voorop gelopen in de ontwikkelingen. Dat betekende een geleidelijke overstap van housingpartner naar hostingpartner. Ook in de hosting liep het bedrijf voorop. Al in 2005 werden alle servers gevirtualiseerd, destijds met het open source product Xen.

In 2008 veranderde het businessmodel opnieuw. Naast platte hosting specialiseerde het bedrijf zich in het aanbieden van Microsoft Dynamics uit de cloud. Dat is een goede beslissing geweest, weet Herb Prooy, market maker bij SaaSplaza. Vanaf dat moment zijn we hard gegroeid, in Nederland maar vooral ook daarbuiten.

SaaSplaza biedt Dynamics niet rechtstreeks aan eindklanten aan, maar zit onder de motorkap van het cloudaanbod van de Microsoft-partners. Momenteel werkt het bedrijf voor 120 Microsoft Dynamics partners wereldwijd en dat aantal groeit nog altijd gestaag.

Handmatig werk automatiseren

SaaSplaza onderscheidt zich met een uitstekende service. Als de applicatie onverhoopt ineens uit de lucht gaat, dan lossen wij dat op in plaats van dat we de melding doorspelen naar onze klanten, zoals gewone hostingpartners dat doen. We leveren niet alleen ijzer, we leveren een dienst. Klanten maken met ons SLAs op applicatieniveau en niet op infrastructuurniveau. Dat is een groot verschil met anderen, verklaart Prooy het succes van de formule.

Om die SLAs te garanderen, had SaaSplaza behoefte aan system management functionaliteit die niet in Xen aanwezig

Bron: Computable Lees het complete artikel hier: http://www.computable.nl/content/mscloud_artikel/4519336/4434365/saasplaza-onderscheidt-zich-met-service.html?utm_campaign=pb_home&utm_source=pb_home&utm_medium=pb_home

KLM implementeert private cloud

25 mei 2012
By

Testomgeving in drie maanden live

KLM had al een volwassen IT-omgeving, die op Linux na volledig was gevirtualiseerd. De implementatie van een private cloud is de volgende stap in het groeimodel. We hebben gekozen voor de technologie van Microsoft omdat die ons in staat stelt om meerdere OS-sen in n cloud onder te brengen. Zo blijven we maximaal flexibel. Een gesprek met Timor Slamet en Irma van der Kroef.


In de zomer van 2011 vatte Timor Slamet het plan op om stap voor stap de ICT van KLM onder te brengen in een private cloud. Slamet is als technical director bij KLM IT Operations verantwoordelijk voor de architectuur en engineering van de IT-infrastructuur, De aanleiding voor het cloudproject is de steeds sneller veranderende wens van de business. De dynamiek wordt steeds groter, de business wil nieuwe applicaties steeds sneller ter beschikking hebben, en die applicaties worden ook veel vaker dan vroeger aangepast en veranderd. We hebben gewoon de tijd niet om steeds voor iedere nieuwe applicatie een dedicated omgeving op te zetten. Het idee is: als we applicatieontwikkelaars in staat stellen om volledig geautomatiseerd via self service snel en eenvoudig een ontwikkel- en testomgeving en vervolgens ook een productieomgeving op te zetten, dan kunnen we de time-to-market van nieuwe applicaties aanzienlijk verkorten. Bovendien besparen we daarmee manuren. De gewonnen tijd kunnen we goed gebruiken om meer bezig te zijn met innovatie.

Dat Slamet daarmee ook op hardware bespaart, ziet hij als een leuke bijkomstigheid, maar het was geen doel op zich. Nee, het doel is echt een grotere flexibiliteit, zodat we sneller kunnen inspelen op ontwikkelingen in zowel de operatie als in sales en marketing. Het is onze taak de business zo goed mogelijk te faciliteren.

Private cloud

KLM koos de afdeling Wintel

Bron: Computable Lees het complete artikel hier: http://www.computable.nl/content/mscloud_artikel/4519357/4434365/klm-implementeert-private-cloud.html?utm_campaign=pb_home&utm_source=pb_home&utm_medium=pb_home

HP started then spiked HP-UX on x86 project

24 mei 2012
By

As part of the ongoing lawsuit about whether or not Oracle had committed itself to supporting its software on Hewlett-Packard’s Itanium-based servers, the software giant did a core dump of very interesting documents that show what many of us suspected: that HP did indeed mull acquiring the Sparc/Solaris business and that HP did in fact have a skunkworks that was porting the HP-UX variant of Unix to the x86 processor from Itanium.

It looks like at one point HP was also working on a big fat SMP server to run that HP-UX variant, and based on the Opteron processor from Advanced Micro Devices.

It is a bit surprising that Oracle made the documents a collection of emails and presentations presumably obtained through the discovery process public. The documents were presented along with a letter from Jeb Dasteel, senior vice president and chief customer officer at Oracle. As is the case with any heated issue, there are many different sides to the Itanium story at least three in this particular case, with HP and Intel’s side being just two points of view and Oracle’s being the third. You can also bet on it that Oracle was very careful about what documents it presented in its effort to show that HP and Intel were not exactly pleased about the way the whole Itanium thing had turned out and were arguing about who should pay what in the ongoing development and manufacturing of Itanium chips.

For those of us who enjoy the intense competition in the Unix server space, the two most important documents that Oracle outed relate to Project Blackbird (PDF), which was a rationalization for buying Sun Microsystems back in February 2009, and Project Redwood (PDF), a four-prong battle plan that HP cooked

Bron: The Register Lees het complete artikel hier: http://go.theregister.com/i/cfa/http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/23/hp_project_blackbird_redwood_hp_ux/

IBM to park mainframes on the cloud

22 mei 2012
By

IBM is gussying up its SmartCloud public cloud to make it more useful for enterprise-class customers, in the hope it can lure them away from Amazon Web Services, Hewlett-Packard, Dell and others. Big Blue is also promising to put its System z mainframes on its cloud.

With the SmartCloud Enterprise 2.1 release, based on the company’s System x x86-based servers, Big Blue is boosting the service level agreement on this basic level of its public cloud from the 99.5 per cent availability guarantee that the company offered at launch time in April 2011 to a 99.9 percent guarantee.

That may not seem like a lot, but it is the difference between just under 48 hours of total downtime per year to just under 9 hours, and this can be a big difference for any company depending on infrastructure to run its business. The much-desired five nines of availability means a system is only offline for a little more than five minutes a year, and it is very unlikely that public clouds will offer that guarantee at an affordable price any time soon be it from IBM or anyone else.

In addition to higher availability, the SmartCloud Enterprise 2.1 release of the IBM cloud adds support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.8 and 6.2, two key operating systems that ISVs peddling application software and customers wanting to deploy their own stacks on the cloud, have been asking Big Blue to support. IBM initially supported Microsoft’s Windows 2003 and 2008, Red Hat’s Enterprise Linux 5.4 and 5.5, and SUSE Linux’s Enterprise Server 11 on the virtual server slices atop its x86 iron, in either 32-bit or 64-bit images.

IBM says that it has also upgraded the underlying KVM hypervisor it uses on SmartCloud Enterprise for better scalability and performance (but does not say what

Bron: The Register Lees het complete artikel hier: http://go.theregister.com/i/cfa/http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/21/ibm_smartcloud_enterprise_plus/

Red Hat hits 10-year, $1bn Enterprise Linux birthday

15 mei 2012
By

Comment Making a Linux distribution is easy, and lots of people have done it and continue to do it. All you have to do is get the source code and integrate the pieces you like and slap your logo on it.

Making a commercial Linux distribution that makes enough money to cultivate innovation and stability in the kernel is not so easy, however. Very few companies have done it, but Red Hat is one of them and its Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) marks its 10th birthday today.

RHEL, the commercial-grade operating system that the then young Red Hat created in the wake of going public on the dot-com boom, was not Linux for grownups. That’s what the Fedora, OpenSUSE, Ubuntu, Debian, Gentoo and other development communities are for. No, RHEL was Linux for children.

By “children” I mean it was for corporations of the world that just want to install an operating system, plunk some apps on it, and manage it like they do other platforms and be able to forget that it is even there because it just works.

RHEL emerged from the craze for Linux company IPOs that went hand-in-hand with the the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Red Hat went public in August 1999 and Linux was on fire with Red Hat, as the first big Linux distro offering commercial support, the hottest.

Red Hat had lined up partnerships with Compaq, IBM, Oracle, Computer Associates, and others in the systems racket after Linux was enthusiastically embraced years earlier by academics and the supercomputing labs.

Linux, being open source and out of anyone’s control, made the Unix Wars irrelevant – some would say childish – and the world still wanted the promise of open systems (which was only partly accomplished). And it got open source

Bron: The Register Lees het complete artikel hier: http://go.theregister.com/i/cfa/http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/15/redhat_rhel_ten_years/

Tekort aan opleidingen vertraagt adoptie Linux

15 mei 2012
By

Er is een groot tekort aan Linux-specialisten in Nederland. Linux wordt slechts mondjesmaat onderwezen, waardoor er te weinig in Linux gespecialiseerde iters op de arbeidsmarkt terecht komen.


Op hogescholen en universiteiten zijn de lesprogramma’s gericht op de standaardisatie van de markt. Er is een grote vraag naar Microsoft-specialisten, dus dat is wat er onderwezen wordt. Daar verandering in krijgen is bijzonder lastig en tijdrovend. De lesprogramma’s voor scholen worden geschreven voor een aantal jaren. Daardoor is het niet mogelijk om snel in te springen op veranderingen en nieuwe technologien. De agility die in het bedrijfsleven zo belangrijk is, ontbeert het Nederlandse onderwijslandschap. Doordat het ingewikkeld en tijdrovend is om lesprogramma’s aan te passen, worden er de komende jaren te weinig Linux-professionals afgeleverd door de hogescholen en universiteiten. Dat zal de adoptie van Linux in Nederland ernstig vertragen.

Specialisatie

It-opleidingen zouden naast de basisopleiding korte tracks moeten ontwikkelen waarin studenten in drie maanden bepaalde specialisaties kunnen volgen. Zo kunnen zij 80 procent van hun tijd besteden aan een standaard it-opleiding en 20 procent aan het volgen van tracks. De markt vraagt in toenemende mate om specialisten, maar in de praktijk blijkt dat scholen studenten afleveren met te generieke it-kennis. De specialisatie zouden onze it’ers van morgen al op hun opleiding moeten leren. Daarnaast moeten lesprogramma’s flexibeler worden ingericht, zodat scholen eenvoudiger kunnen inspringen op veranderende trends en ontwikkelingen in de markt.

Ronald de Jong
Vice president emea sales
SUSE

Bron: Computable Lees het complete artikel hier: http://www.computable.nl/artikel/opinie/open_source/4507235/1277105/tekort-aan-opleidingen-vertraagt-adoptie-linux.html

Matige IT-opleiding vertraagt adoptie Linux

14 mei 2012
By

Er is een groot tekort aan Linux-specialisten in Nederland. Linux wordt slechts mondjesmaat onderwezen, waardoor er te weinig in Linux gespecialiseerde iters op de arbeidsmarkt terecht komen.


Op hogescholen en universiteiten zijn de lesprogramma’s gericht op de standaardisatie van de markt. Er is een grote vraag naar Microsoft-specialisten, dus dat is wat er onderwezen wordt. Daar verandering in krijgen is bijzonder lastig en tijdrovend. De lesprogramma’s voor scholen worden geschreven voor een aantal jaren. Daardoor is het niet mogelijk om snel in te springen op veranderingen en nieuwe technologien. De agility die in het bedrijfsleven zo belangrijk is, ontbeert het Nederlandse onderwijslandschap. Doordat het ingewikkeld en tijdrovend is om lesprogramma’s aan te passen, worden er de komende jaren te weinig Linux-professionals afgeleverd door de hogescholen en universiteiten. Dat zal de adoptie van Linux in Nederland ernstig vertragen.

Specialisatie

It-opleidingen zouden naast de basisopleiding korte tracks moeten ontwikkelen waarin studenten in drie maanden bepaalde specialisaties kunnen volgen. Zo kunnen zij 80 procent van hun tijd besteden aan een standaard it-opleiding en 20 procent aan het volgen van tracks. De markt vraagt in toenemende mate om specialisten, maar in de praktijk blijkt dat scholen studenten afleveren met te generieke it-kennis. De specialisatie zouden onze it’ers van morgen al op hun opleiding moeten leren. Daarnaast moeten lesprogramma’s flexibeler worden ingericht, zodat scholen eenvoudiger kunnen inspringen op veranderende trends en ontwikkelingen in de markt.

Ronald de Jong
Vice president emea sales
SUSE

Bron: Computable Lees het complete artikel hier: http://www.computable.nl/artikel/opinie/open_source/4507235/1277105/matige-itopleiding-vertraagt-adoptie-linux.html

IBM taps new execs to run Power Systems, mainframes

11 mei 2012
By

The executive who has been running IBM’s combined Power Systems and System z mainframe units has taken a new high-level position working out Big Blue’s overall strategy for the future for new CEO Ginni Rometty, and the company has appointed new leaders for its Power and mainframe units in the wake of that appointment.

Tom Rosamilia, who ran the System z mainframe business for a stint, took over the combined Power Systems and System z business back in August 2010. Rosamilia appointed Colin Parris VP and business line manager for the Power Systems side and Greg Lotko has been named VP and business line manager for the System z servers.

Rosamilia, who started out at IBM as an MVS developer in 1983, was appointed to head up System/390 software development in 1996; he brought Linux to the mainframe two years later, and then was made general manager of various software products within Software Group, including DB2, IMS, and Informix data management tools and then WebSphere products. He eventually became general manager of the vast WebSphere portfolio, which includes middleware, transaction processing, e-commerce, and other stuff.

Now, Rosamilia is vice president of corporate strategy and general manager of enterprise initiatives, and according to his bio will be “responsible for the strategic direction of IBM’s future, as well as developing the path that IBM will take as we move forward in this new era of computing.” Which sounds like the best possible job at the IBM Company, really. Anyway, keep your eye on Rosamilia. He is young enough to be the next CEO at IBM, and has done the classic turns through hardware and software to rise to the top someday.

When Rosamilia was tapped to move up to his new position, IBM broke the System z and Power Systems lines back into two

Bron: The Register Lees het complete artikel hier: http://go.theregister.com/i/cfa/http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/10/ibm_server_exec_changes/